Total Lunar Eclipse tomorrow morning (21st December) - A Viewer's Guide - Tree of Souls - An Avatar Community Forum
Tree of Souls - An Avatar Community Forum
Go Back   Tree of Souls - An Avatar Community Forum » General Forums » Science and Technology

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old 12-20-2010, 09:06 PM
Dreaming Of Pandora's Avatar
Karyu
Dreaming Of Pandora Nostalgia++
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Ireland
Posts: 1,381
Default Total Lunar Eclipse tomorrow morning (21st December) - A Viewer's Guide

Be sure to be watching the Moon in the West as it sets. From 7:40 - 9am (GMT) the Earth will cast its shadow on the Moon as it moves between the Sun and the Moon as shown:



Viewer's Guide:

The total eclipse of the moon is often a beautiful event. To prepare for this rare event on Dec. 20-21, here are some tips to keep in mind.

During the time that the moon is entering into, and later emerging from, the Earth's shadow, secondary phenomena may be overlooked. Below are descriptions of the 12 stages of a total lunar eclipse. [Lunar Eclipse Viewing Guide]

Click here for a table showing the times of all 12 stages in different time zones. This space.com star chart shows where in the sky the upcoming lunar eclipse will appear.

The 12 stages:

1) Moon enters penumbra (12:29 a.m. EST/9:29 p.m. PST) The shadow cone of the earth has two parts: a dark, inner umbra, surrounded by a lighter penumbra. The penumbra is the pale outer portion of the Earth's shadow. Although the eclipse begins officially at this moment, you won't see anything unusual happening to the moon.

The Earth's penumbral shadow is so faint that it remains invisible until the moon is deeply immersed in it. You must wait until the penumbra has reached roughly 70 percent across the moon's disk. For about the next 45 minutes the full moon will continue to appear to shine normally although with each passing minute it is progressing ever deeper into the Earth's outer shadow.

2) Penumbral shadow begins to appear (1:13 a.m. EST/10:13 p.m. PST) Now the moon has progressed far enough into the penumbra so that it should be evident on its disk. Start looking for a very subtle light shading to appear on the moon's upper left portion. This will become increasingly more and more evident as the minutes pass; the shading will appear to spread and deepen. Just before the moon begins to enter the Earth's dark umbral shadow the penumbra should appear as an obvious smudge or tarnish on the moon's left portion.

3) Moon enters umbra (1:33 a.m. EST/10:33 p.m. PST) The moon now begins to cross into the Earth's dark central shadow, called the umbra. A small dark scallop begins to appear on the moon's upper left-hand (northeastern) limb. The partial phases of the eclipse begin; the pace quickens and the change is dramatic. The umbra is much darker than the penumbra and fairly sharp-edged.

As the minutes pass the dark shadow appears to slowly creep across the moon's face. At first the moon's limb may seem to vanish completely inside of the umbra, but much later, as it moves in deeper you'll probably notice it glowing dimly orange, red or brown. Notice also that the edge of the Earth's shadow projected on the moon is curved. Here is visible evidence that the Earth is a sphere, as deduced by Aristotle from Iunar eclipses he observed in the 4th century B.C.

Almost as if a dimmer switch was slowly being turned down, the surrounding landscape and deep shadows of a brilliant moonlit night begin to fade away.

4) 75 percent coverage (2:23 a.m. EST/11:23 p.m. EST) With three-quarters of the moon's disk now eclipsed, that part of it that is immersed in shadow should begin to very faintly light up similar to a piece of iron heated to the point where it just begins to glow. It now becomes obvious that the umbral shadow is not complete darkness. Using binoculars or a telescope, its outer part is usually light enough to reveal lunar seas and craters, but the central part is much darker, and sometimes no surface features are recognizable.

Colors in the umbra vary greatly from one eclipse to the next. Reds and grays usually predominate, but sometimes browns, blues and other tints are encountered.

5) Less than five minutes to totality (2:37 a.m. EST/11:37 p.m. PST) Several minutes before (and after) totality, the contrast between the remaining pale-yellow sliver and the ruddy-brown coloration spread over the rest of the moon's disk may produce a beautiful phenomenon known to some as the "Japanese lantern effect. "

6) Total eclipse begins (2:41 a.m. EST/11:41 p.m. PST) When the last of the moon enters the umbra, the total eclipse begins. How the moon will appear during totality is not known. Some eclipses are such a dark gray-black that the moon nearly vanishes from view. During other eclipses it can glow a bright orange.

The reason the moon can be seen at all when totally eclipsed is that sunlight is scattered and refracted around the edge of the Earth by our atmosphere. To an astronaut standing on the moon during totality, the sun would be hidden behind a dark Earth outlined by a brilliant red ring consisting of all the world's sunrises and sunsets.

The brightness of this ring around the earth depends on global weather conditions and the amount of dust suspended in the air. A clear atmosphere on Earth means a bright lunar eclipse. If a major volcanic eruption has injected particles into the stratosphere, the eclipse is very dark.

7) Middle of totality (3:17 a.m. EST/12:17 a.m. PST)The moon is now shining anywhere from 10,000 to 100,000 times fainter than it was just a couple of hours ago.

Since the moon is moving to the north of the center of the Earth's umbra, the gradation of color and brightness across the lunar disk should be such that its lower portion should appear darkest, with hues of deep copper or chocolate brown. Meanwhile, its upper portion - that part of the moon closest to the outer edge of the umbra should appear brightest, with hues of reds, oranges and even perhaps a soft bluish-white.

Observers away from bright city lights will notice a much greater number of stars than were visible earlier in the night. The darkened moon will be near the constellation Taurus, just beyond the tips of the bull's horns and hovering high above the stars of Orion, the hunter.

The darkness of the sky is impressive. The surrounding landscape has taken on a somber hue. Before the eclipse, the full moon looked flat and one-dimensional. During totality, however, it will look smaller and three-dimensional - like some weirdly illuminated ball suspended in space.

Before the moon entered the Earth's shadow, the temperature at the lunar equator on its sunlit surface hovered at 260 degrees F (127 degrees C). Since the moon lacks an atmosphere, there is no way that this heat could be retained from escaping into space as the shadow sweeps by.

Iin shadow, the temperature on the moon plummets to minus 280 degrees F (minus 173 degrees C). A drop of over 500 degrees F (300 degrees C) in only about two hours.

8) Total eclipse ends (3:53 a.m. EST/12:53 am. PST) The emergence of the moon from the shadow begins. The first small segment of the moon begins to reappear, followed again for the next several minutes by the Japanese Lantern Effect.

9) 75 percent coverage (4:10 a.m. EST/1:10 a.m. PST) Any vestiges of coloration within the umbra should be disappearing now. From here on out, as the dark shadow methodically creeps off the moon's disk it should appear black and featureless.

10) Moon leaves umbra (5:01 a.m. EST/2:01 a.m. PST) The dark central shadow clears the moon's upper right hand (northwestern) limb.

11) Penumbra shadow fades away (5:20 a.m. EST/2:20 p.m. PST) As the last, faint shading vanishes off the moon's upper right portion, the visual show comes to an end.

12) Moon leaves penumbra (6:04 a.m. EST/3:04 p.m. PST) The eclipse officially ends, as the moon is completely free of the penumbral shadow.

--

This is in EXTREMELY rare astronomical event - there hasn't been a total lunar eclipse on the winter solstice in 372 years! The next one will take place in 2094. Catch this now, you'll never see it again!

Astronomers at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., will host a pair of live web chats to answer questions and help make the rare celestial experience one to remember. Marshall Center astronomer Rob Suggs will hold the first chat from 3 - 4 p.m. EST on Dec. 20 and discuss the best ways to view the eclipse. From 12 a.m. - 5 a.m., Marshall researcher Mitzi Adams will answer questions as the eclipse passes across the continental United States. A live video feed of the eclipse will be available on the chat site at:

NASA - Total Lunar Eclipse: 'Up All Night' With NASA!

For observers on the East Coast, the eclipse will last from 1:33 - 5:01 a.m. EST. The eclipse happens when the moon passes through the shadow of Earth, and the moon's appearance changes from bright orange to blood red to dark brown and perhaps gray. To learn about the science behind eclipses, visit:

NASA - ECLIPSE

NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, Calif., has set up a lunar eclipse Flickr group for those who want to share or view photos of the eclipsed moon. NASA will choose one photographer to have his or her work featured as official JPL wallpaper on their website. To learn more, visit:

Flickr: NASAJPL's I'm There: Lunar Eclipse Group

JPL also is hosting the "I'm There: Lunar Eclipse" text campaign to connect people who are watching the eclipse in the same area and to provide them with tips on viewing the phenomenon. To learn more, visit:

http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/imthere/map.php

NOTE: No special equipment is needed to view this event. In some cases, particularly the GMT timezone, the sky is expected to turn blood red as the Sun rises and as the Moon sets. Such an event should look like this:


Last edited by Dreaming Of Pandora; 12-20-2010 at 09:15 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 12-20-2010, 09:21 PM
Human No More's Avatar
Toruk Makto, Admin
Human No More has no status.
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: In a datacentre
Posts: 11,751
Default

Interesting... I'll have to watch
__________________
...
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 12-20-2010, 09:27 PM
LOVEavatar's Avatar
Tsahik
LOVEavatar has a urge to watch Avatar again
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Sweden-Uppsala
Posts: 2,066
Send a message via MSN to LOVEavatar Send a message via Skype™ to LOVEavatar
Default

****... all I can see is clouds. I hope they move away till tomorrow :/ I will definitely keep a watch nevertheless
__________________

Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 12-20-2010, 10:56 PM
Dreaming Of Pandora's Avatar
Karyu
Dreaming Of Pandora Nostalgia++
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Ireland
Posts: 1,381
Default

Oh clouds are bad. Should definitely have a word with Mother Nature about the bad weather.

You won't be able to avoid this event anyway, if you're going to work or school or whatnot, depending on where you live, the Moon will be an unusual colour and so should the sky. Best wishes for clear skies!
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 12-20-2010, 11:03 PM
LOVEavatar's Avatar
Tsahik
LOVEavatar has a urge to watch Avatar again
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Sweden-Uppsala
Posts: 2,066
Send a message via MSN to LOVEavatar Send a message via Skype™ to LOVEavatar
Default

thanks and no worries, tomorrow I end before lunch ^^ LAST SCHOOL DAY FTW
__________________

Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 12-20-2010, 11:55 PM
Mika's Avatar
Tsamsiyu
Mika Finally got her dream job. Full Time Librarian! :")
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 727
Default

I just heard about this at work today .. supposed to be around midnight here .. and I will be up to try and see it .. but its cloud cover here .. so not sure if will be able to!

Thx for the post !
__________________
It was impossible not to have, It's impossible not to be, It's impossible not to still ...!



What this world really needs is more artists and environmentalists!



"Its only 'here' that we lose perspective, out at the Cosmic Consciousness Level things get a lot clearer. For example, there is an actual star pattern that is traced in the shape of a Willow Tree, across the breadth of the Milky Way! And no wonder Indigenous peoples refer to the 'here after' as the Happy Hunting Grounds! Has it ever occured to anyone why the bioluminescence dots, on the Na'vi!"
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 12-21-2010, 12:14 AM
Empty Glass's Avatar
Karyu
Empty Glass has no status.
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 1,422
Default

Clouds over where I am too. Plus bucketloads of rain that won't let up until Thursday.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 12-21-2010, 12:42 AM
Dreaming Of Pandora's Avatar
Karyu
Dreaming Of Pandora Nostalgia++
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Ireland
Posts: 1,381
Default

I'll get pics of it for all that might miss the event due to weather.
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 12-21-2010, 01:10 AM
Earthlover18's Avatar
One of the People
Earthlover18 is looking for my Neytiri
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: North Carolina, USA
Posts: 215
Default

I can't wait! Me and a friend are going out to watch it on the river far away from city lights. Im taking my telescope to get a closer view and also check out some star clusters and galaxies during totality.

It is fascinating how from Europe you guys will be seeing it as it sets, here in the East Coast of the US it will be nearly overhead for the event. I wish you all clear skies!
__________________


"Just as I have come from infinity, so I return to infinity,

between which events, for a little time, I came to celebrate that miracle which I could never fathom."

-Mary Jean Irion


"Why bother with reality when there's imagination?"
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 12-21-2010, 01:10 AM
X.,.Pandora.,.X's Avatar
Tsulfätu
X.,.Pandora.,.X Is finally home
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: North Carolina
Posts: 1,580
Default

It's at 3-4am for me FUUUUUUUUUUUUUUUU-
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #11  
Old 12-21-2010, 05:22 AM
TheIknimaya's Avatar
Tsamsiyu
TheIknimaya has no status.
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Canada. Pandora someday...
Posts: 715
Default Total Lunar Eclipse tomorrow morning (21st December) - A Viewer's Guide

I've got a perfectly clear view of the moon right now. Hopefully it stays that way.

I'm in Eastern time so Stage 1 at least is supposed to start at around 12:29 am here.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #12  
Old 12-21-2010, 05:55 AM
Fighter-of-Wars's Avatar
Adventurer
Fighter-of-Wars is alive and well
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Illinois
Posts: 945
Default

All clouds for me right now. *midwest* I have been waiting up hoping for it to clear but it doesn't appear to. Guess I will have to go to bed

Uber sad face at missing this rare event.
__________________
Reply With Quote
  #13  
Old 12-21-2010, 06:12 AM
SullyJake1's Avatar
‘Eylan
SullyJake1 is Jake sully
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Northn NJ (near NewYork)
Posts: 137
Default

should be clear for me
__________________

Reply With Quote
  #14  
Old 12-21-2010, 07:00 AM
Helicoradian's Avatar
Nawmtu
Helicoradian nope...no status
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Washington
Posts: 1,220
Default

Watching right now
__________________


Reply With Quote
  #15  
Old 12-21-2010, 07:09 AM
Dreaming Of Pandora's Avatar
Karyu
Dreaming Of Pandora Nostalgia++
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Ireland
Posts: 1,381
Default

Stage 1 should begin in half an hour or so.

There's a dense fog here blurring the Moon but a telescope or large binoculars should penetrate it. The fog should clear as the morning and eclipse progresses.

Last edited by Dreaming Of Pandora; 12-21-2010 at 07:13 AM.
Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



Visit our partner sites:

      pandoraworld.ru



All times are GMT +1. The time now is 08:59 PM.

Based on the Planet Earth theme by Themes by Design


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Content Relevant URLs by vBSEO ©2011, Crawlability, Inc.
All images and clips of Avatar are the exclusive property of 20th Century Fox.