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  #1  
Old 09-17-2011, 06:48 AM
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Smile Aboriginal Dreamtime stories.

I decided that it would be amazing if I put some of these stories down here. I grew up listening to them at school and it really helps to put Aboriginal culture and especially the spiritual relationship that the Aboriginal people have with the land into context. Many of these Dreaming stories are passed down through certain tribes and shared with other tribes and they help to explain land formations and the creation of the Aboriginal tribes.

I'll post one story a week, though if University work gets on top of things it might take a bit longer. Anyway, enjoy the read and hopefully we can all learn new things from one of the oldest and spiritual cultures on earth. I think it would be awesome if we told these stories to family and friends so we can all respectfully acknowledge the wisdom and deep spirituality of the Aboriginal people. Maybe some of you guys from the US could pass down some Native American stories on another thread to share with the rest of us.
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Old 09-17-2011, 06:50 AM
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Here's the first one: The Rainbow Serpent which is one of the most well known stories from The Dreamtime. Feel free to discuss it. Taken from: Aboriginal Dreamtime: The Rainbow Serpent

The Rainbow Serpent dreamtime story is always linked to natural watercourses in the landscape such as creeks, rivers, lagoons and billabongs. However it should be noted that if the Rainbow Serpent is not properly respected then it can also be a destructive force.

The most common version of this dreamtime story goes like this:

In the Dreaming the earth was bare, cold and flat where the Rainbow Serpent slept underground and kept all the animal tribes within her tummy where they waited to be born. When the time came for them to be born, she pushed up and called to them to come out of their sleep.

She was strong and pushed out the land to create mountains, and she spilled water over the land to make rivers, lakes and billabongs. She also made the sun and fire, and all colours of the rainbow.

She also forced great passages through rock and made many waterholes. The Gagudju people know the Rainbow Serpent as a major creator being and called her Almudj. Even today Almudj is still recognised as a great creator as she is responsible for bringing the wet season each year which gives life to all, and can be seen in the sky as a rainbow.

However Almudj should also be feared as she may hand out punishment by drowning in floods, to anyone who has broken a law.
Almudj still lives in a pool under a waterfall in Kakadu, Northern Territory.

Another interpretation is as follows:

The Aboriginal Jawoyn people, who live in the Katherine Gorge area of the Northern Territory, have a similar but different interpretation. They tell how the Rainbow Serpent would sleep under the ground until one day when she awoke in the Dreaming and pushed her way to the surface of the earth. Then she traveled over the land, and stopped to sleep when she became tired. She left behind her snaking, winding tracks and the imprint of her sleeping body on the land. After she had traveled across the earth, she returned and called out to the frogs to come out. The frogs were very slow because they had bellies full of water.

The Rainbow Serpent tickled the tummies of the frogs, and when the frogs laughed, the water flowed out of their mouths and in turn filled the tracks and hollows on the ground that were left by the Rainbow Serpent. This created the rivers and lakes. Because of this all the animals and plants awoke and followed the Rainbow Serpent far and wide across the land.
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"The man who learns only what others know is as ignorant as if he learns nothing.
The treasures of knowledge are the most rare, and guarded most harshly."
-Chronicle of the First Age


"Try to see the forest through her eyes."

Réalisant mon espoir, Je me lance vers la gloire. Je ne regrette rien. (Making my hope come true, I hurl myself toward glory. I regret nothing.)
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Old 09-17-2011, 06:57 AM
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I do like hearing about religions sometimes. Some of the best stories IMO come from religious/spiritual stories, and much of the time they're not the ones we're used to hearing, but some less explored like this one. I liked it
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Old 09-17-2011, 06:59 AM
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That's great! I don't know about indigenous peoples of the world having a "religion" but the spiritual stories always help other people to understand some things about history and culture. It's really important to spread these stories.
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"The man who learns only what others know is as ignorant as if he learns nothing.
The treasures of knowledge are the most rare, and guarded most harshly."
-Chronicle of the First Age


"Try to see the forest through her eyes."

Réalisant mon espoir, Je me lance vers la gloire. Je ne regrette rien. (Making my hope come true, I hurl myself toward glory. I regret nothing.)
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Old 09-17-2011, 07:03 AM
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Oh, I love these stories!

I used to love reading them when I was little. I believe there's a story somewhere that involves monitor lizards...I'd like to hear that one. OwO
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Old 09-17-2011, 07:10 AM
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I'll try to find it for next week. Glad you love them!
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"The man who learns only what others know is as ignorant as if he learns nothing.
The treasures of knowledge are the most rare, and guarded most harshly."
-Chronicle of the First Age


"Try to see the forest through her eyes."

Réalisant mon espoir, Je me lance vers la gloire. Je ne regrette rien. (Making my hope come true, I hurl myself toward glory. I regret nothing.)
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Old 09-19-2011, 09:57 PM
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Thank you for the story.

I d like to add two bits that I remember.

One is that supposedly that place under the waterfall in the northern territories where the rainbow serpent is sleeping is under threat by an uranium (?) mining project. The aboriginies have the story that if the rainbow serpen is disturbed and her resting place runs dry, she will wake up and do devastating things (some say "destroy/eat the world").

The other is that one thing always has to be remembered when hearing these stories. Songlines, which are the "storylines" of dreamtime stories are physical as well as within the story. They refer to actual places and locations and one can travel along them and follow the stories. That waterfall really exists as a physical place. songlines contain not only stories, but also information abouot the cultural context, about morphology of the landscape, climate, waterways, safe travel paths, moral and ethical rules, and much more. They ensure peace between the tribes that share them, which are basically most of the aboriginal australians.
The stories are good to hear and I love to hear them, but I try to keep in mind, that what we can share here, by written words from a far distant place is only a fraction of what such a story from a songline really is.

Oh and on a sidenote - I find it interesting to read about the rainbow serpent. In a story I wrote some time ago elsewhere, the serpent actually died and from that the rivers formed. The story involves a number of other characters as well, telling how it came to be that salmon swim upstream and some other parts - its cool that I "foound" an ancient story it seems.
I wonder if the other story I wrote at the same time - aboout a tree falling ini love with the spirit of the fire is also in some of these ancient stories. That tree ended up living near the edges of the forewst because the others are afraid of it as she still hides the fire spirit under her skin. That skin turned white because of that and it can catch fire really easily (If you want, you can now think about how we call this tree in our language now )
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"Humans are storytellers. These stories then can become our reality. Only when we loose ourselves in the stories they have the power to control us. Our culture got lost in the wrong story, a story of death and defeat, of opression and control, of separation and competition. We need a new story!"
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Old 09-20-2011, 01:02 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pa'li Makto View Post
That's great! I don't know about indigenous peoples of the world having a "religion"
May I ask how you define 'religion', then? I really don't mean to stir up a storm, Pa'li, but I really would like how to know how you claim a series of peoples with deep traditions going back centuries, if not thousands, if not tens of thousands of years (depending on the group in question), with organization and prayer and ritual don't have religion. It, uh, can come across as very patronizing, rather 'of cause they aren't sophisticated enough to have a religion' (even though I'm sure you don't mean insult).

That said, I do like the idea of spreading around the Dreamtime myths, as they are deeply interesting. Sally Morgan's take on them is very excellent, and her art-work is just amazing.
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Old 09-20-2011, 02:54 AM
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Originally Posted by Ashen Key View Post
May I ask how you define 'religion', then? I really don't mean to stir up a storm, Pa'li, but I really would like how to know how you claim a series of peoples with deep traditions going back centuries, if not thousands, if not tens of thousands of years (depending on the group in question), with organization and prayer and ritual don't have religion. It, uh, can come across as very patronizing, rather 'of cause they aren't sophisticated enough to have a religion' (even though I'm sure you don't mean insult).

That said, I do like the idea of spreading around the Dreamtime myths, as they are deeply interesting. Sally Morgan's take on them is very excellent, and her art-work is just amazing.
Please don't label me as demeaning or patronising, that is the very opposite of what I am trying to say and it does sting when you call me that. If anything spirituality is far older then the tradition of religion (Which is very much a modern construct used by a lot of western people when describing anything spiritual) and you would appear to be demeaning aboriginal beliefs if you called it religion which every Aboriginal that I've spoken to is dead against. I think there's a clash of classification and meaning between you and I and that's it.

I like to call it faith or mythology. I always think of religion as something that has lots of rules, ceremony and texts that people have to follow or at least feel like they have to follow. I suppose I think of religion as a more formalised and rigid form of worship where there is little room for experimentation or interpretation. I view indigenous beliefs as a form of spirituality instead as the system of beliefs and rituals are more broad then religious belief as it doesn't pertain to just the worship of god/gods but a form of living your whole life around it..The land, family structure ect is encompassed by the belief in the Dreaming. I hope that clears it up for you but I'm really hesitant to call indigenous beliefs a religion.

Check this out: It sums up what I mean: http://www.creativespirits.info/abor.../spirituality/
Quote:
What is not Aboriginal spirituality?

Many texts and books use 'Aboriginal religion' when addressing Aboriginal spirituality. But these two terms should not be confused:

Spiritual "relates to people's deepest thoughts and beliefs, rather than to their bodies and physical surroundings" [2].

Religious is "something that [...] is about or connected with religion", i.e. "the belief in a god or gods and the activities that are connected with this belief, such as prayer or worship in a church or temple" [2].

Hence spirituality is the foundation of religion, the deeper layer of any religious practice and expression.

"Some little children come in and say 'but God made the world'. And I say, 'Yes, according to the Bible, yes, God did; but according to my spiritual beliefs my rainbow serpent made these things', so we don't have any arguments over that either; they understand: religion is their way, spiritualism is our way. They understand."

—Oodgeroo Noonuccal, Aboriginal writer [20]
How Aboriginal people express spirituality

Indigenous people express and identify with their spirituality in different ways. These include

ceremony (corroborees),
rituals,
totems,
paintings,
storytelling,
community gathering,
dance,
songs,
dreamings,
designs.

[Aboriginal] spirituality is preoccupied with the relationship of the earth, nature and people in the sense that the earth is accepted as a member of our family, blood of our blood, bone of our bone. —Mudrooroo, Aboriginal writer [17]



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"The man who learns only what others know is as ignorant as if he learns nothing.
The treasures of knowledge are the most rare, and guarded most harshly."
-Chronicle of the First Age


"Try to see the forest through her eyes."

Réalisant mon espoir, Je me lance vers la gloire. Je ne regrette rien. (Making my hope come true, I hurl myself toward glory. I regret nothing.)

Last edited by Pa'li Makto; 09-20-2011 at 03:12 AM.
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Old 09-20-2011, 07:58 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pa'li Makto View Post
Please don't label me as demeaning or patronising, that is the very opposite of what I am trying to say and it does sting when you call me that. If anything spirituality is far older then the tradition of religion (Which is very much a modern construct used by a lot of western people when describing anything spiritual) and you would appear to be demeaning aboriginal beliefs if you called it religion which every Aboriginal that I've spoken to is dead against. I think there's a clash of classification and meaning between you and I and that's it.

I like to call it faith or mythology. I always think of religion as something that has lots of rules, ceremony and texts that people have to follow or at least feel like they have to follow. I suppose I think of religion as a more formalised and rigid form of worship where there is little room for experimentation or interpretation. I view indigenous beliefs as a form of spirituality instead as the system of beliefs and rituals are more broad then religious belief as it doesn't pertain to just the worship of god/gods but a form of living your whole life around it..The land, family structure ect is encompassed by the belief in the Dreaming. I hope that clears it up for you but I'm really hesitant to call indigenous beliefs a religion.

Check this out: It sums up what I mean: Aboriginal and Indigenous Spirituality - Native Beliefs, Spirituality & Religion
Thank you for explaining what you meant. It's the classification issue, yes, as I see far, far, far more often that in this debate, people tend to go it's only 'civilized' people who have the depth of their believes and ritual and lifestyle called 'religion', while the 'indigenous' (which, ugh, I really wish in general people would clarify which group they are referring to, because they are hardly a homogeneous culture across the entire globe) are seen as 'primitive and childlike' to borrow a phrase. Which, yes, is exceedingly patronizing, but given that's the normal context, I had no idea what you meant. So, I did jump to the wrong conclusion, and for that I do apologize.

(although, um, religion does not relate to a person's entire life? I think a lot of religious people would argue that when you are devout, it really does colour their entire life and how they live it.)
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Old 09-20-2011, 08:07 AM
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Thankyou Ashen Key, disagreements can happen with anything but I'm glad that it's over as quick as it began ma tsmuke. I understand where you are coming from there it's just that I don't believe that religion covers as much aspects of someone's life compared with spirituality. It's up for questioning but not here though because none of the spiritual threads are meant for debates.

Anyway, I think I'll post the next story up.
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"The man who learns only what others know is as ignorant as if he learns nothing.
The treasures of knowledge are the most rare, and guarded most harshly."
-Chronicle of the First Age


"Try to see the forest through her eyes."

Réalisant mon espoir, Je me lance vers la gloire. Je ne regrette rien. (Making my hope come true, I hurl myself toward glory. I regret nothing.)
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Old 09-20-2011, 08:20 AM
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Taken from: Eloi Jerra (Goanna) Dreaming with Dreamtime Story Coffee Mugs - Zazzle.com.au

Goanna Dreaming Story:

ELOI JERRA (goanna) DREAMING According to Dreamtime there was a great warrior called Tummuddie who lived at the edge of the great desert. He spent his life looking after the desert. Making sure everyone and everything who lived there was safe. He ensured that the desert lands stayed clean and calm, especially where the messy emu’s lived. As the warrior’s life was coming to an end the Father Spirit Baiame called him to the ancient lands of Alcheringa. The home of his family and warriors gone before him. However the warrior refused to leave. He was not ready to leave his desert. Tummuddie ran into the desert and endeavoured to hide himself away from the spirits that came to collect him. He tried to hide in an emu’s nest, but it was too messy. Eventually he lay down and covered himself with sand near some rocks. Baiame thought about the situation and feeling sorry for the old warrior, and greatful for his lifelong work in the desert, decided to turn Tummuddie into the Eloi Jerra (the great sand goanna). Tummuddie emerged from beneath the sand and was very happy with his new form. He rushed to a billabong on the edge of the desert to view himself. He looked upon his now long body and strong tail. He looked up his new majestic head and strong claws. A tear came to his eyes and as it dropped to the sand, a plant began to grow. Today we call this plant salt bush. Salt bush became the plant that many animals and reptiles of the desert eat when food is scarce. Tummuddie still lives in the great desert and he is still making sure that everyone is safe, even the messy emu’s. If you should ever visit the desert, and if you are lucky, you will see Tummuddie resting just beneath a thin layer of sand, just in case the spirits are still on the look out for him.
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"The man who learns only what others know is as ignorant as if he learns nothing.
The treasures of knowledge are the most rare, and guarded most harshly."
-Chronicle of the First Age


"Try to see the forest through her eyes."

Réalisant mon espoir, Je me lance vers la gloire. Je ne regrette rien. (Making my hope come true, I hurl myself toward glory. I regret nothing.)
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  #13  
Old 09-20-2011, 08:23 AM
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And another Goanna one for Raiden.

How The Goannas lost their wives. Taken from: http://learningtogive.org/resources/...ishGoannas.asp

Soon after the events that are recorded in the previous story a great drought visited the country. There was no rain, and all the dams and rock holes became dry. The porcupine and the emu tribes did not know what to do, because among their members there were many aged and infirm. Some were sick, and a great many had little children; so they were in great difficulties. They were not able to move down to the River Murray, where they would have been well and comfortable.

The drought did not affect the goanna (a type of monitor lizard native to Australia) tribe, as they had a secret reservoir with a supply of water that would last them for very many years. The cries of the little children, and the distress of the aged and sick, touched the hearts of the wives of the goannas, and they would secretly go among the other tribes and do all they could to supply their wants and relieve their sufferings. One day they asked their husbands to tell them where the great rock hole reservoir was, as they were anxious to supply water to the aged and the sick and the children of the porcupine and emu families. But the selfish goannas refused, and, what was worse, they said to their wives, " Since you are taking such an interest in the needs of others, we will give you only just sufficient water to slake your own thirst."
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The wives found that it was useless to plead with their obstinate husbands; but they were determined that, although they had given way to many objections before, and had willingly suffered the indignity of refusals, they would not let this insult pass. So they began to search for the reservoir. They would take up their yam-sticks that their husbands should believe that they were going to dig yams and roots of plants and shrubs. But they would track the footprints of their husbands, which led them to the mountain. At the foot of the mountain they would lose all trace of the footprints, so they would return to the valley and gather a few yams and herbs, and then go to their homes. They would cook the yams in the hot ashes, and then sit down with their husbands and families to eat. Sometimes a goanna would ask his wife where she had been for such an unusually long time. He would say, " I notice a speck of dirt that comes from the mountain. Have you been there?" The wife would reply, "What do you think, you silly? Do you imagine that we go searching for yams on the mountain-top? We find and dig yams in the low, flat country, not on rocky mountains. Now why do you ask such questions?" The goanna, without another word, would lie down upon his opossum-skin.

In the morning, just as the sun rose over the eastern range of mountains, the men of the goanna tribe were out looking for food, and their wives were up too. They had met to discuss what to do in order to discover the secret of the reservoir. One, more thoughtful than the others, said, " It would be a wise plan to go up the mountain and make a mia-mia (a rough or temporary hut or shelter in the bush, especially one built from bark and branches), and camp there and make observations. Now who among us has courage? Let us sit a while and think who will go."

So they sat in silence for a few moments, and then one rose. All eyes became fixed on her. She was the wife of the chief. She said, "Sisters, I take the responsibility. I offer to go. I consider it is my duty as wife of a chief. Who will come and help me with my camp necessaries?"

Two young wives stood up, and said, "We will go with you."

So they made haste and rolled up the belongings of the chief's wife, and the three women hurried away to the moun-tain before the chief and the other goannas returned from their hunting. Half-way up the side of the mountain there was a spot which gave a good view of the surrounding valley, and especially of the goanna camping-ground. After making the mia-mia the two young women returned home, leaving the chief's wife on the mountain.

In the evening the young chief summoned the goannas to his mia-mia and asked them whether anyone had seen his wife, or had any knowledge regarding her disappearance. All expressed great sorrow, and said they had no knowledge of the matter, nor could they suggest any reason why she should leave the camp. They told their chief that they would do all in their power to assist him to recover his wife if she had been taken a captive to some other home.

Then the chief summoned the teal teal (small ducks), the wives of the goannas. They were closely questioned by the chief and the elders, but they remained standing with their heads bowed, and would not make any reply. The questioners tried by threats to make them speak, but they shook their heads and remained silent. The chief of the goannas then ordered that the wives should return to their mia-mia. When the teal teal were safely home the chief said to the men, "I have a suspicion that the emus have come to our home while we were out hunting, and have taken my wife, and have given her to the young chief of the tribe. So to-morrow, before the sun rises beyond the mountain-peak, every one that is able to fight will take with him three kaikes (reed-spears), four waddies (weapons made from part of the stem and root of a certain kind of mallee and much sought after by the boys and young men. It is used principally in hunting the kangaroo, wallaby, emu, and wombat when these animals are in motion.), four panketyes (boomerang), and a nulla-nulla (battle club), and we will march into their land and seek my wife. Then, if she be not there; we will return and march into the land of the porcupines. So to-night let every one go to his mia-mia and wait for the cry, 'Rise at once!’“

So every goanna man went straight home to bed and slept soundly. They rose early, and marched into the country of the emu. As soon as the goannas had left home the teal teal rose and met to consider what they should do. One thought it would be well if the two young women who had accompanied the chief's wife hurried away and told her that her absence had caused a stir. So while the chief with his army was marching into the land of the emus, thinking that it was they who had captured his wife and made her the wife of the young emu chief, the young teal teal girls were run-ning to the mountain to tell the chief's wife what was taking place. She sat quietly and listened to what they had to tell, and then in reply she said, "Now is our deliverance. We have been given in marriage to these beings who are not of our race and kind. I have made a discovery. At the dawn of day I was fast asleep, and a Tuckonie (These are little men who live in thickly timbered country. The aboriginals believe these queer little people visit the camping ground and become acquainted with all the ways of people.) came into the mia-mia and sat beside the fire warming himself. Suddenly I awoke and saw him comfortably seated there. I became so alarmed that I shrieked with fear; and he turned his eyes upon me and said, “Do not be afraid. I am your friend, and the friend of all that are in trouble or distress. I and my companion saw you and the two others come up from the plain, and some of my brothers have visited your camping-ground and know all about you. You are in search of a water-hole, and you have been guided by the mind of my tribe to this spot. You have been sleeping. If you will follow me when I come again I will show you the opening on the top of this mountain.”

When the Tuckonie returned the wife of the chief of the goannas rose and followed him up the mountain. When they arrived at the top he bade her sit down and rest. The little spirit man went away a few paces and gave a call somewhat like the coo-ee, (aboriginal bush cry to call the attention of a person at a distance) and like a flash out of space there came many little men. Their bodies were striped with red ochre and white pipeclay. They had white cockatoo feathers deco-rating their heads and tied round their wrists like bracelets. In their hands they held their spears, about two feet long. Each one wore a belt of opossum-skin round his waist, and in this belt there were placed three tiny boomerangs and waddies. They circled round their leader, eager to receive his instructions. After a little talk they made way for him, and he came out from their midst and walked toward the wife of the goanna and stood beside her. They followed him, and he addressed his bodyguard thus, "Hear, 0 my brothers we have been appointed by the unseen beings that are about—the Spirit of Good, the Spirit of Water, the Spirit of Food, the Spirit of Pleasure, the Spirit of Lightning and Thunder and Wind and Rainstorm, and lastly the Spirit of Sunshine. The goannas have withheld from the tribes that inhabit this country the long-needed water that is locked up in this mountain; they have used this gift for their own selfish ends, and have refused to share it with the aged and the infirm and the children of other tribes. And, what is more, they have refused to supply the necessities of their own wives. Give this woman the help she requires in order to let loose the water that is contained in the mountain."
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"The man who learns only what others know is as ignorant as if he learns nothing.
The treasures of knowledge are the most rare, and guarded most harshly."
-Chronicle of the First Age


"Try to see the forest through her eyes."

Réalisant mon espoir, Je me lance vers la gloire. Je ne regrette rien. (Making my hope come true, I hurl myself toward glory. I regret nothing.)
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  #14  
Old 09-20-2011, 08:24 AM
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Part 2

The little spirit man turned to the wife of the chief and took her a few paces farther on to a basin-like hole in the rock. He asked her to look into it. She looked and saw sparkling water, clear as crystal. " Drink," he said, and she drank until she was satisfied. "Now," he said, "you must descend, and when you reach the foot of the mountain you will meet two young women. You must ask them to hurry back to their camp and instruct the others that they must all stand on the northern side of the valley toward the porcupine boundary and await your coming."

So she went and did as she had been told. The two young women also hurried back to the camp to deliver their message, and the other teal teal, as they were asked, stood waiting on the northern side of the valley. Meantime the chief's wife stood at the base of the mountain, waiting for further instructions. Presently the Tuckonie stood beside her, and said, "0 woman, these good and great spirits have given you the privilege of letting loose the waters that are anxious to be freed from the bonds that have held them prisoner these many, many years. You shall be a blessing to all the animal, bird, reptile, and insect tribes. You must keep this great event in remembrance. Tell your children of the privilege that the Spirit of Water conferred on you. Take this." He handed her a grass-tree stick, and said, "At a given signal thrust it into the mountain-side, and the water shall be let loose."

Again the Tuckonie disappeared. The chief's wife stood there alone, thinking over this strange happening. She pinched her arm and struck her leg to see whether she was asleep. She felt the pinch and the blow. "I am very much awake," she said. "What a wonderful experience!" Then a voice said, "Thrust the stick into the mountain." She placed the point of the stick against the mountain-side, and pushed hard. It gradually went in farther and farther, until it had gone its whole length. Then the voice of the Tuckonie said, "Now flee for your life to where your sisters are." She sped down the valley as fast as her feet could carry her. When she had gone half the distance a loud noise, as of a mighty wind, broke the still air. It was the sound of the water leaping forth out of its prison and thundering down the valley with the speed of a mighty wind.

The chief's wife arrived among her teal teal sisters, and breathlessly told them that the water from the mountain would be flowing down the valley. While she was speaking they saw dust rising from the hill-side, and the water tearing its way through the valley, and huge trees being uprooted and carried along. They looked with amazement as the water rushed past them on its way to join the Murray River. When it reached the Murray it settled down to be a flowing river. The teal teal came to its bank, and sat in the shade of the trees, watching their children sporting and splashing in the water.

Next day the goannas returned, and were making their way to the camp when they beheld with wonder that a river separated them from their wives and children. They were greatly annoyed. The chief called to the women across the dig a hole in the ground and bury themselves in it, and weep during the dark, cold wintry nights, until they fall into a deep sleep, which lasts until spring calls them forth to take up their burden of life once more. And, in revenge for the loss of their wives, they rob the nests of the teal teal of their eggs, thinking that by devouring the eggs they may put an end to the existence of their former wives.
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"The man who learns only what others know is as ignorant as if he learns nothing.
The treasures of knowledge are the most rare, and guarded most harshly."
-Chronicle of the First Age


"Try to see the forest through her eyes."

Réalisant mon espoir, Je me lance vers la gloire. Je ne regrette rien. (Making my hope come true, I hurl myself toward glory. I regret nothing.)
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  #15  
Old 09-20-2011, 08:27 AM
Pa'li Makto's Avatar
Palulukan Makto
Pa'li Makto : Once ate an octopus.
 
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One more: Blue-tongue Lizard Dreamtime Story Taken from: Blue-tongue Lizard Dreamtime Story

The blue-tongue lizard dreamtime story is about the lizard called Kurrih and the dillybag called Bulbbe

As told and painted by Leslie Nawirridj
Gunbalanya (Oenpelli)
Western Arnhem Land, NT
One day, in this dreamtime story, there was a man making a dillybag, called bulbbe. The bulbbe was for carrying food when he went for his bush tucker. While he was making it, he saw a group of men coming. They were his enemies. They were going to spear him and kill him. He was scared, so he formed himself into a blue-tongue lizard, called kurrih. He crawled inside the bulbbe to hide from his enemies.

Now that bulbbe was made out of string from the kurrajong tree. The string was really hard and tightly woven. It stuck on his back while he was inside the bulbbe. That’s why the skin on the kurrih is so hard that other animals, like the king brown snake, can’t bite him. His skin is strong and hard like a tightly twined bulbbe.

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Always listening to The Orb: O.O.B.E...



My fanfic

"The man who learns only what others know is as ignorant as if he learns nothing.
The treasures of knowledge are the most rare, and guarded most harshly."
-Chronicle of the First Age


"Try to see the forest through her eyes."

Réalisant mon espoir, Je me lance vers la gloire. Je ne regrette rien. (Making my hope come true, I hurl myself toward glory. I regret nothing.)
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